Quote

Knowledge 

“Knowledge enables us to love God and love our neighbors more fully.

If we’re not putting what we know to work in our lives, then our knowledge will simply make us more arrogant. There’s a terrifying irony here: your study if he Bible could actually lead you further away from the Lord.

The problem definitely isn’t solved by studying less. Instead, we should be learning everything we can and immediately applying it. We should be begging God to give us a deeper love for Him and others so we can take the truths He reveals and put them into practice.”

Francis Chan

Advertisements
Quote

Two-edged Sword

This means that as we study the Bible, we should be looking to change. Hebrews 4:12 warns us that “the word of God is living and active, sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing to the division of soul and of spirit, of joints and of marrow, and discerning the thoughts and intentions of the heart.” Though we primarily think of the Bible as something we read in order to gain knowledge, we actually have it backward. The Bible reads us– it penetrates to our core and exposes who we really are. If you ever find yourself reading your Bible and not changing, then you can be sure that you’re approaching the Bible in the wrong way. It’s not about finding support for our lifestyle or way of thinking; it’s about approaching the mind of God and letting Him change and redefine who we are. 

Francis Chan (Multiply)

Quote

Love

Something about the way we love the people around us should signal to the world that we belong to Jesus. Our mission will include preaching, encouraging, rebuking, serving, studying, suffering, and many other things. But if all of these activities are not manifestations of love, then we have missed the point. 

Francis Chan

Quote

Discipleship

The disciples went about making disciples, teaching them to obey everything that Jesus commanded and baptizing them. Some of them even moved to different areas or traveled around so that they could tell more people. They took Jesus’ words seriously– and literally.

Reading through the New Testament, it’s not surprising to read that Jesus’ followed were focused on making disciples– it makes sense in light of Jesus’ ministry and the Great Commission. The surprise comes when we look at our churches today in light of Jesus’ command to make disciples.

Why is it that we see so little disciple making taking place in the church today? Do we really believe that Jesus told His early followers to make disciples but wants the twenty-first-century church to do something different?

Francis Chan (Multiply, 29-30)